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Past Exhibitions

      

2016

Luminous: Tom Malone Prize 2016

30 January – 2 May 2016

This year’s prize was judged by Art Gallery of Western Australia Director, Stefano Carboni; Art Gallery of Western Australia Foundation Benefactor, Elizabeth Malone; Director of the Jam factory, Brian Parkes, and Gallery curator, Robert Cook.

Now in its fourteenth year, the Tom Malone Prize is a highly respected and eagerly anticipated event for contemporary Australian glass artists. This is reflected in the high quality of the prize winners and the competitive shortlists.


WA Focus - Graham Miller
21 November 2015 – 28 February 2016

Graham Miller is one of Western Australia’s most important photographers. He is known for his atmospheric images that combine cinematic vision with the eye-for-subtle-detail of a short story writer.

AGWA's WA Focus display presents works spanning more than fifteen years of Miller's output. It comes together around two distinct threads: a body of landscape works and a group of portraits. Generous in spirit and outlook, his works are emotionally rich and often moving portraits of people and places. Each portrait invites curiosity about the possible events that have brought his subjects to this point in their lives, and each landscape evokes the sensation of being fully within the urban and natural environments presented.


Resistance

8 November 2015 – 21 February 2016

Resistance is a presentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices and worldviews about contemporary Indigenous life.

It features Indigenous knowledge systems and commentary on Indigenous experiences, histories, cultures and people. It highlights the importance of ‘voice’ to combat voicelessness and invisibility — conditions that are regularly experienced by Indigenous peoples and minorities around the world.


American dream, American nightmare

15 August 2015 15 February 2016

American dream, American nightmare is a two-part display that focuses on one of the Collection’s most iconic and most requested works, Brett Whiteley’s The American dream 1968-1969.

This major, 18 part installation has not been seen at the Gallery since 2004 and it is looking better than ever: the work has recently received major conservation treatment prior to its inclusion in the major survey of Australian and international Pop art Pop to Popism at the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

Whiteley’s work is a dynamic visual summation of his experiences in America, that charts his initial passion for the place, his intense responses to the politics and culture, and his powerful desire to leave it all behind. It is therefore a meditation on the crumbling of Whiteley own romantic dream of what America might offer him and a reflection on a society torn apart by its involvement in the Vietnam war and the assassinations of John Fitzgerald Kennedy and Martin Luther King.

Treasure Ships: Art in the Age of Spices

10 October 2015 31 January 2016

Treasure Ships: Art in the Age of Spices features the spectacular and exotic art produced for global markets from the sixteenth to early nineteenth centuries.

Demand for spices spurred on the great voyages of exploration and the establishment of vast empires across Asia. Treasure Ships presents the stories of the spice markets, slave trade and shipwrecks, as well as illustrating the astonishing beauty of Chinese porcelain, known as ‘white gold’ and celebrating vibrant Indian textiles created for export around the world.

This exhibition includes 250 outstanding and rarely-seen examples of ceramics, decorative arts, furniture, maps, metalware, paintings, prints and textiles from public and private collections in Australia, India, Portugal, Singapore and the United States.

Screen Space Shaun Gladwell

14 November 2015 10 January 2016

Shaun Gladwell is one of Australia's most renowned contemporary artists and was the Australian representative at the 53rd Venice Biennale. His dual-channel video installation Broken Dance (Beatboxed) continues the artist's engagement with the urban sub-cultures given expression through the body, against a backdrop of graffiti covered spaces.



 

 

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